During a North Carolina divorce, your children will experience massive change that they have to adjust to. As the parent, you have to ease that transition and help your child feel a sense of stability. Knowing that each child may react differently can help you to design a plan for adjustment.

There is no right or wrong way for your children to react. Some children will focus on immediate needs. For instance, they may worry about where they will live and whether they will have to change schools. Children may react poorly to changing their routines, reports Mayo Clinic. It is important that you can maintain the routine as much as you can.

Divorce can change children. It can lead to bad behavior and acting out. Each age has reactions that you are more likely to see in your children. For toddlers two and under, your children may react by clinging to you or your spouse. They may have difficulties sleeping and subsequently react irritably. For older toddlers and preschoolers, children may not understand why the divorce occurred. This is the age where children are likely to blame themselves.

Older children, at school age, are more likely to show you that they are angry. They may assign blame or entertain the idea that you might get back together with your spouse. Teenagers, on the other hand, may act out. They may suffer for depression or worry that they will not have successful relationships. No matter what your child experiences, you can help him or her adjust through open discussion.

The above article is not meant to be given as legal advice. It is for information purposes only.