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Addressing your drug charges in a job interview
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Addressing your drug charges in a job interview

On Behalf of | Jan 15, 2021 | Drug Charges |

Even though you know you have put forth a commendable effort to overcome your drug addiction, convincing an employer in North Carolina of that may not be so easy. When the topic of your criminal past surfaces in a job interview, knowing how to respond can be the only difference between whether or not you get the job.

With an understanding of the best way to discuss your past without destroying your opportunity, you can participate in job interviews with confidence and poise.

Establishing a reputation

You have one chance to establish your reputation when you enter an interview. Greet interviewers with enthusiasm. Come prepared with a clear understanding of the job description for the job you applied for. Research the company ahead of time to learn about its ideals, mission and competitive strategies.

Dress appropriately for your interview. Use professional language and wait until the interviewer finishes asking a question before you respond. When discussing things you enjoy doing, your educational accomplishments, your skills and your experience, find creative ways to tie them into the required job qualifications.

Marketing your skills

The uncomfortable part of your interview comes when you face questions regarding your drug charges. According to Monster, take full accountability for your actions. Answer questions with enough detail to provide context, but without oversharing unnecessary information.

After answering questions about your past, redirect the discussion to how your experience has enabled you to grow as a person. For example, you may share how your completion of a drug rehabilitation program helped you develop time management skills, as well as gave you unique opportunities to participate in a group objective. Make correlations about how the skills you improved upon could make a considerable difference to the company if they hired you.