Joint custody is usually in the best interest of children, but it can be a difficult situation to manage logistically. It can be stressful to have the kids moving between different houses.

In response to these difficulties, some divorcing families choose a “nesting” living arrangement. Nesting, As stated in Psychology Today, is when children live in one house and the parents move in and out like birds attending to a nest full of babies.

How is this practical?

Nesting is normally not a permanent arrangement. Many families decide to try a nesting arrangement when the parents are first separating. In this situation, nesting is beneficial because it allows the divorcing parents to have space without disrupting the general rhythm of the children’s lives.

In other cases, the family may live in a very expensive area. While it may be possible for the parents to maintain a household if both of them are financially contributing, it may not be possible for the parents to maintain households as single individuals. Here, nesting can allow the parents to maintain the family home and children can continue schooling with the same friends.

Where do the parents live?

This depends on the individual arrangement. In some situations, the “off-duty” parent will reside with other friends or family. In other situations, the parents may decide to maintain an apartment for the off-duty parents to live in.

Again, in the majority of situations nesting is not long-term. Nesting requires a high level of communication between parents to work, since the parents must collaborate on paying bills and managing the living situation of the children.